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In this section: What is open data? | Learn more about open data | Open data in New Zealand

What is open data?

Open data is data that anyone can use and share. It has an open licence, is openly accessible and is both human-readable and machine-readable. You’re probably already using open data every day – for example, geospatial information (getting from A to B), weather data (deciding how to dress for the day) and government census data (making business decisions). Open data drives innovation. It helps to build new business and encourages more strategic investment – creating new jobs, new industries and stronger economies. It can also lead to positive social and cultural outcomes, and can increase transparency and democratic participation.

Read some case studies about innovative reuses of open data.

What is open government data?

Open government data:

  1. does not include private information about individuals (it is non-personal, unclassified and non-confidential)
  2. is of high value, and contributes to economic, social, cultural or environmental growth
  3. provides transparency and illustrates the government's performance
  4. contributes to greater government efficiency through improved information sharing
  5. is collected, commissioned or created by a government agency in carrying out its everyday responsibilities
  6. is publicly funded
  7. can be freely used, reused and redistributed by other agencies and the public
  8. has an open licence for reuse (Creative Commons using NZGOAL).

Open data in New Zealand is released under the New Zealand Data and Information Management Principles, which state that it should be:

  1. open
  2. protected
  3. readily available
  4. trusted and authoritative
  5. well-managed
  6. reasonably priced (preferably free)
  7. reusable.